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mark on american law in his 33 years on the bench, but his greatest contribution is is renowned commentaries on the constitution. justice story a famously and correctly declared "a constitutional government is addressed to the common sense of the people and never was designed for trials of logical skills or visionary speculation." this lecture series celebrates his legacy in the law. prior lectures have been judge robert bork, professor john harrison, judge raymond randolph, and chief justice of the united states court of appeals of the sixth circuit. tonight, we're honored to add a fifth name to that prestigious list as a welcome justice anthony kennedy. justice kennedy received his bachelor of arts degree from stanford university and the london school of economics and his law degree from harvard law school. prior to this public service, the justice served in private practice in san francisco and sacramento. i can attest to his prowess as an attorney because on one very interesting occasion, he represented me. [laughter] on a speeding ticket. [laughter] and got me off with a mi
democrats. in april 2011, a law took affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from parks to marketplaces to shops. although the law does not mention the words women, muslim, boar can, or even israelied, it was introduced by president as a ban on muslim vailing which according to him imprisons women and threatens french values of dignity and equality. the new law rear renders. have adopted some type of restriction. on april 28, 2011, the belgium voted far similar ban although the law is expected to be challenged before the constitutional court. in spain, in 2010, the say -- in all public places reversing an earlier vote supporting the ban. similar laws in progress in italy as well. in switzerland, after at campaign designed to aappeal to fears of the muslim takeover. a popular referendum voted by 57% to ban the construction of -- [inaudible] associated with the mosques. despite the fact that very few mosques in switzerland have them. they are only four in the whole country out of 150 mosques. and that in consequence, the architect issue is cl
? >> it would be much larger constituency about creating that device. >> beyond that, law enforcement has other techniques. they do not need a special device. there is still reckless driving on the books, the power of the nation -- of observation and other evidence that can be relied upon. the same outcome to restrict -- >> can odor be introduced as evidence? rex the officers perception of an odor can. some potential evidence. >> talking about regulating the illegal drugs, they mentioned that 80% of the position painkillers in the world are sold in the united states. five percent of the population of the world's 80% of the world's painkillers. drug related overdoses for death -- close to 70% were from prescription drugs. even the drugs that we regulate -- we do not seem to be doing too good of a drug -- of a job at a lot of people are dying to reque. >> we would not have any car fatalities if there were no cars. i do not need to make light of what you're saying but the fact that failure of the peace and not condemn the value that exists for these other off -- these other. this brings up a large
with supreme court justice anthony kennedy. and then yale law professor talks about how president obama stance on same-sex marriage. this week on "newsmakers, "president of the service employees international union talks about what unions like the seiu are looking for in budget negotiations. can see "newsmakers" at 10:00 a.m. >> what about if the soviet union announces tomorrow but if we attack cuba, it is going to be nuclear war? >> serious things here, we're .oing to be uneasy p >> something may make these people should off. -- shoot it off. i would want to make my own people very alert. >> it is a fascinating moment. it is amazing that eisenhower tells him to have a people alert. of course people are alert. kennedy laps. then he says, -- laughs. then he says, hang on tight. they're able to joke a little bit with each other. especially during this crisis, the had a sense of how lonely it is to occupy that office and i were getting all kinds of a device, good advice, a lot of faulty advice, which kennedy was. eisenhower knew all about faulty military advice. he is able to speak with supreme a
of cases he mentions jefferson was a good master and jefferson's son-in-law, who ran things around here when jefferson was away, was in charge, kind of an accident overseer. colonel randolph and going through the records i found that colonel randolph when he was strapped for cash, took isaac's daughter, maria and salted -- soldier to an overseer who took the young girl away to kentucky and she was never seen again. now, isaac did mention that in his memoir. why? i really don't know. maybe he told his interviewer and the interviewer to want to write it down. maybe isaac did what to say anything about hurt feelings of a white. maybe it hasn't left an impression on you just don't know and it leads like you guys had a lot of music that we really don't know and that the psychological, possible psychological distortions that took place under slavery is something we are still wrestling with. another person's memoirs are spent a lot of time with were those of peter fossae. he left to memoirs. he gave new super entities in the late 1800 -- 1800s rather. he was born here and was one of the slaves
in the record as saying nothing in this treaty will require any initiative by the united states to change a law or reduce any capacity of our courts to uphold the constitution of the united states. and i think he did an important service in his comments with respect to to that. our fight is not over, we have some work to do in the next days and i look forward to working with him on that. mr. lugar: i join the chairman in thanking john mccain for his testimony, his courage, his eloquence, his mention of those on our side of the aisle historically who have fought for the disabled. that's a very important fact today, and his presence, his strength, and determination were very inspiring. we appreciate so much his testimony. mr. kerry: mr. president, i suggest -- the presiding officer: the senator from massachusetts. mr. kerry: i suggest the absence of a quorum and ask that time be charge against both sides. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. durbin: mr. president? the presiding officer: senator from illinois, the assistant leader. mr. durbin: i ask that the quorum
the liberal protestant churches. this reinforced the second exceptional pillar, common law, which causes that god has given her the law given from god to the people and bubbles upward to the rulers. this gives us the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to. common law stands in stark opposition to almost every other nation on earth that is develop some form of civil law in which it trickles down from the top. both germany and england had, not for a while but by the 20 century have more or less abandoned it common to many more such an inkling. by the end of world war ii, when you're unloaded however i'd willingly if colony, those colonies for themselves designed on principles of civil law. thus the first to pillars taken together mean that a christian protestant religion influenced and shaped everything about america's foundation of laws and defined system of personal rate. it wasn't just that the united states is a democratic republic, but that the very premises of a democratic republic meant were likely to be far different in the united states
who makes the laws. caller: president obama could not put anything in there before his term going out. i have been following this for years. usually the incoming president has bills that the previous president left. on this president's way out, congress would not let him put any deals in. they put enough in there to finish his term. host: the president has been reelected and will be back in next year. but i appreciate the call. i want to point to an obituary in the new york times today on the death of warren redmon. he dies at age 82. the sometimes combative centrist republican senator from new hampshire. you will be seeing those obituaries in several papers today. coming up next, a top supreme court reporter david savage will join us to talk about some of that the-profile cases an accord will be taking up. and later, phyllis bennis will take a closer look at where u.s. troops are deployed around the world, and not just in the middle east. first, turning back to warren rudman. he was a moderate republican senator from new hampshire. he was 82 years old when he died. he sat down with c
.k. and across the european union. >> past centralization when it comes to labor law, when it comes to financial service regulation, when it comes to even fairly mundane things like agricultural production, there is this extraordinary degree of centralization. harmonization has not created a utopia. it has created misery and poverty for millions of europeans. >> this seaside resort lies in the heart of his constituency. most of the arguments when it comes to the you relate to the economy. -- most of the arguments when it comes to the e you relate to the economy -- most of the arguments when it comes to the eu. >> i think we're just failing to allow a lot of the time, and then our own country is suffering. we're too busy dealing with everyone else. am i think the -- >> i think the eu has a lot to do to get itself out of trouble. >> those in favor of the eu are in the minority here, but they are part of. one growth organizes cultural exchanges -- one group organizes cultural exchanges. they are going to supply the local christmas market with wine from their local german city. >> i feel part of eur
was a good master and that jefferson's son-in-law who ran things around here when jefferson was away, cornel raldolf was in charge he was an executive overseer. he was a good master. it in going through the record i found that he -- when he was strapped for cash, took isaac's daughter and sold him to overseer who took the young girl away to kentucky and she was never seen again. now, isaac didn't mention that in his memoir, why? i really don't know. maybe he told his white interviewer and the interviewer didn't want to write it down. maybe isaac didn't want to say anything that would hurt the feelings of a white man. maybe it didn't -- maybe it hasn't left my impression. we don't know. it's not there. it leads one to realize that there is a lot in these accounts that we really don't know, and that the psychology possible distortion that took place under slavery that we are still wrestling with. another person's memoir who i spent a lot of time with was peters to et. he left two memoirs he gave newspaper interviews in the late 1800s. he was born here and he was one of the slaves who was aucti
expression. ( drumbeats ) taxation without representation: copley's father-in-law, an english merchant, was importing tea to america. copley felt he could not speak out against his family, nor could he defend them. seeking his artistic heritage, he sailed for europe. it wasn't long before he became part of that heritage, a forerunner in the great romantic movement. still, the longer his self-imposed exile in england, the greater his loneliness. his children were his models. the commissions continued. but his greatest masterpieces were painted while memory and imagination were fresh. ( drumbeats, lively trumpet notes ) in his isolation in england, copley worked harder to be america's first great painter. "poor america," he wrote, "yet certain i am she will finally emerge from her present calamity and become a mighty empire. and it is a pleasing reflection that i shall stand amongst the first of the artists that shall have led the country to the knowledge and cultivation of the fine arts." narrator: ...yet george catlin had a grander dream: he was an artist in search of a cause. ( native
to january 12012. tom: are you serious? did just passed a tax law that will go back to the beginning of the year? >> absolutely right. property is retroactive. the tax part of it is retroactive to january 1st 2012. the money generated from that goes to solidify the pesions of the teachers. it does not go to the schools at all. these are the games the democrats played day in, day out, wheeher it's california or waington d.c. tom: well, there have been some people lately that have been talking about one prominent publisher from weekly standard, bill kristol. they have been playing that over and over again. you know, after all i guess tea party people and everybody else and not too concerned about raising taxes on millionaires because half of them live in hollywood. are they goin to --it seems like some people on the ride are starting to talk about raising taxes. >> well, certainly - listen, you can't sit and raise taxes on everybody ele just to get back in hollywood. half of hollywood goes to monaco. you don't have to pay taxes. en head of facebook gave up his citizenship. democrats, i
now" with this fox news alert. just when you thought obamacare was the law of the land the supreme court has opened the door for a legal challenge. the liberty university, the religious institution founded by the late reverend dr. jerry fallwell has filed suit against obamacare and the supreme court says that suit has enough merit to be reheard by the fourth circuit court of appeals. essentially the liberty university folks are saying under religious freedom they should not have to live up to all the requirements under obamacare. the supreme court says that argument has merit. they kicked it down to the 4th circuit. depending what they decide, the supreme court could decide the same thing all over again based on rights of religious freedom. we'll continue to keep an eye on this. but a surprise and perhaps a momentous decision this morning from the u.s. supreme court. jenna: we'll con continue to watch that story a fox news alert. we're awaiting the outcome of a very pivotal meeting that could potentially ease the crisis in egypt or push that country into further chaos. that is one
they are on camera. >> biggest difference is is that is their house. there are still eavesdropping laws that apply to that when you are in a public place if you have visible cameras and a sign that says you are on video surveillance you have to say it's in the eye of the mannequin. >> the mannequin is not visible. you think you are just looking at a mannequin not an eye. >> she is looking at me and staring at me. >> stick around much more on legal debate. we will twin other topics this morning. a teen sentenced to church instead of going to jail for accidentally killing someone in his car. the aclu says it's unconstitutional. does the punishment fit the crime? with verizon. hurry in this saturday and sunday for great deals. likehe lucid by lg, free. or the galaxy nexus by samsung, free. this weekend, get the best deals on the best devices on the best network. exclusively at verizon. it's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities
. >> i think you have to talk about whether it's by law or by culture. and i think most evebody would have understood early on that by law, the nation was secular, but by choice, the nation was -- in other words, its people were christians and there's always been that dynamic, people have always understood there's a tension there between a population that's largely christian but uses its freedom to choose christiity and the laws that say go ahead ande whatever religion you want to be. >> this is what i understand from your text. one of five of the founding fathers had any religious stressed denomination or affiliation and that was when it existed calvinist and that was pretty much of a god almost independent of jesus, correct, a watch maker god who starts the earth and then he leaves it on its own, a deistic god? >> well, no, in terms of the population there's the calvinists and the deists. >> way back then? >> right. the calvinists totally predominated among the population. the founding fathers were much more elites and yes, many of them were deists but in terms of the vast majority
to government hand outs? a republican law makers demanding that the department of scort scort taking down the web site showing new immigrants how to sign from medicaid to food stamps. is this the new american dream. welcome to forbes on fox we'll go to mr. steve forbes elizabeth and rick and mike. steve, is this the america you know and love? >> no, david, it is not just immigrants of the country. people here now they are trying to make dependent on the government. that means more votes for them and you center the hidous cartoon. birth to death. corrupting us and the immigrants and got to stop it >> rick, it is it a land of opportunity and hand outs. >> no one is handing it out. >> yes, they are. nit is just information that is available. same example -- information that shows up. anybody here in the table mitt romney, his father when he came here from mexico. he got that exact kind of government aid and he turned out to be president of one of the nation's biggest autocompanis and became governor of the state of the michigan. >> my dear friend rick unger has to be brought up to date. he d
or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions, the liberals, the secularists, women's rights groups, the youth groups. essentially, their position is that we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he rescinds his decrees, and we spoke to one of his
sources that a team led by executives from kpmg as well as a law firm here in india and as of now, the chief financial officer along with another couple of key executives have been suspended. they've been asked not to report to work until this internal investigation is complete. this couldn't have come at a worst time because remember the india parliament has been given the go ahead as far as walmart being able to step up its stores here in india. so this is going to be another reason for the opposition parties to force the government into a possible reversal of the decision. so it's looking difficult for walmart at this point in time. we've tried to contact the company. they have confirmed the investigation is on. there is no time line that's been given by when they expect a conclusion for this internal investigation, but until the investigation is not complete, we've been given to understand that the chief financial officer and the other executives asked not to report to work will not be allowed to be part of the operati operation. this may jeopardize their expansion plans. that
not have any say and another that states that no legislature and no court can overturn any law he makes. so, poof, he dictator, saying he is trying to speed up the government transition but opponents argue he has appointed himself a new dictator and egyptian health officials say violent clashes between police and the pro democracy demonstrators led to one death and hundred credits of injuries. and now to cairo, what happened with the meeting with the judges today with president morsi? >>reporter: details still coming out but this was supposed to be a dave compromise when the egyptian president reached out to opponents, some of the chief judge whose have opposed his move to put himself above the law and the courts and make a compromise on that decree, perhaps modify it. initial reports say there was no back down by the president, insteads saying he stands firm on his right to impose that decree and any laws he issues are final and above the law. really, you can hear it filter into the crowd. they are getting news of this and the anger and energy of the crowd has risen in the past hour. >>she
to do ts he had to violate a law because there is law that says every six months you have to come out with the cost in terms of jobs and money of new regulations. and that was due the 31st of october. he just, you know, flagrantly disobeyed the law so people didn't know. now we're looking at these huge things coming on us, i'm talking about, the, you've seen the whole list. melissa: i hear you. it is agonizing. no, i hear you. senator, thank you so much for coming on the show. we appreciate your time. >> thank you, melissa. melissa: here is our "money" question of the day, should a higher federal gas tax be part of a fiscal cliff compromise? we want to hear what you think. like us on facebook.co facebook.com/melissafrancisfox or follow me on twitter twitter,@melissaafrancis where almost no one liked the tax. >>> fuel gauge report tod, oil fell more than half a percent settling at 87.18 a barrel. >>> six u.s. senators are asking justice department to launch a probe of west coast oil refineries. remember we told you about this story. recent analysis, refineries were operating earlier th
to this one particular law passed in the 1980s. and how does that account for rising income inequality in canada? or even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? it is happening all over the world and the emerging market. it is important to face that squarely because if you see it just as a political phenomenon you are going to lose sight of what i think is a big challenge which is that these actually quite benign economic forces, and i love the technology revolution. are also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, how he sees it is the big drivers are probably the economic forces but the issue is that particularly in the united states the politics, instead of trying to mitigate these very powerful economic forces, has exacerbated them. even if you have economic forces creating more concentration at the very top you expect politics to try to soften the blow, financial institutions to soften the blow and instead it is accelerating and to me that is about right. who are the sup
they will sphop work until the new president repeals his thursday decree that gave him the power to issue laws without oversight ask chance of them being over turned by the courts. the judges say he's trying to put himself above the law. it will be interesting to see whether all legal prosecutions come to a halt. numbers are fall down today. and numbers large yesterday about 40,000 at their peek and the protest turned violent. one police car set on fire. and protestors are hurling molotov cocktails and the violence in egypt is not limited to cairo police officers of the muslim brotherhood were ran sacked and set on fire. (inaudible) >> we apologize for the technical difficulties from steve who is reporting to us from cairo. and joining us now dr. feres and more on the foul out over the egyptian's move to seize power. welcome. thank you for having me. >> on the heel of the high profile role. many are saying that they are surprised by morsies unprecedented power grab and others say no surprise at all. do you agree? >> it is not a surprise for those who understand what the plan and strategies hav
a -- some kind -- adopted a right to work law like in wisconsin, ndiana, and elsewhere. exactly how much of an import is this loss to the unions? >> oh, well, it was not just trying to ban right to work, but give government unions and effective veto over past, present, and future legislation. david: what kind of legislation? >> anything for government unions affected, hours, wages, terms and conditions of employment. david, atonement conditions could be as mundane as the price of candy in a vending machine. david: while unions score in terms of the president, bringing out the work force to get the president re-elected, on the local level, they lose state after state. michigan, wisconsin, governor recount. failed on that as well. >> that's right. i mean, you know, they lost by over ten points with governor walker's recall, and lost 42-58 in michigan, the the number one priority, and, yet, both states re-elected democrats, sent democrat senators to washington. they both re-elected obama by a resounding margin so you got to say, well, wait a minute, even these, you know, democrat voters vot
on with your life and another one where because of law enforcement tactics and focus, you end up caught up in a system where you can never move on. you're permanently trapped and weighed down by having a felony conviction. the reason i call it a war on crumbs is the type of people we see at the hall of justice, i brought with me some props. i brought with me a sweetener packet. this is a gram of sweetener. most of the time this is on the high end of the amount of narcotics we see people in possession of. sometimes people have two or three sweetener packages on them and we call them drug dealers, you know. that's why we call it a war on crumbs because the amounts we are talking about are mine us schedule. -- minnesota us schedule. the fact -- are miniscule. and based on less than a packet of sweetener, to me is outrageous. and to me this is a positive first step, in my opinion, because at least you remove some of the stigma attached to this type of issue which in my opinion should be a public health issue. it's a public health issue for a certain segment of the community and should be a pub
, projects are due by january 31st. just check out exploravision.org to get started. >> some laws are very weird. for example, in st. louis, it's against the law for a firefighter to rescue a woman wearing a nightgown. like i said, some laws are very weird. >> not all magic has to do with spells and potions. there's magic that any of us can do. but as veronique reports, the trick is dedication. >> he looks like a regular teen, hanging out with his family at the kitchen table. but mitch abrams is actually magical. [ ding ] >> [ laughs ] this won't cut it, and that's too long, and that's just right. >> he calls himself magical mitch. >> take the medium rope. >> when he was just eight, his dad showed him his first magic trick -- this one. you might say mitch was immediately roped in. >> pull, and they all become the same. that trick amazed me, and it made me really want to learn magic and get into performing magic for others, and it really pushed me into what i'm doing now. >> now 15, mitch is a master of magic. and he's happy to demonstrate some of his tricks to alison, a summer intern at "t
's social and law and order conservatives, who are concerned about preserving america's unique culture and the maintenance of social order. to these conservatives the presence of large numbers of people in the united states and in violation of american law is inherently problematic. what's more, many of them aren't wild about the influx of large numbers of illegal immigrants either, arguing that any culture needs sufficient time for new arrivals to assimilate and that cultures can benefit from periodic pauses in immigration. now, there's some other camps as well, for example, moral and social conservatives, such as some in the catholic church and other religious groups who favor what might be called a light-touch approach to immigration on what they believe are social justice grounds. but the broader point is there is a deep tension and division on the right on immigration, and there has been for decades now. the recent presidential election has brought the immigration issue once again to the center of american politics. governor mitt romney received a small percentage of latino and as
could push back the start of basel iii by about six months. the law was mepts ant to be pha in by the start of 2013. >> archstone was not part of the zell asset, was it? >> i feel like zell was related to it. >> but he sold right at the top. so that was part of the problem. it wasn't just a total lack of due diligence. i mean, everything was valued hire when archstone was first sold, right? >> yes. but as i'm looking at this, no, sam zell i do not believe was involved. >> that was the equity office and -- >> and then blab stone. but blackstone even though they bought at the top figured out a way to then sell pieces of it very, very quickly. and they did very well. >> entrade is no longer accepting u.s. customers citing legal and regulatory pressures. that announcement coming hours after the u.s. commodities regulators sued the exchange's owner alleging that it allowed unauthorized trading by u.s. customers, u.s. customers must close their accounts and withdrawal all funds by the end of the year. and a group of former mf global customers is asking a court for permission to su
said that we should return to the clinton era tax law. just think of that era we had. we had a budget surpluses. and we had a winning prosperity. i do not think we need to fear returning to the clinton tax law. and as the caller said from texas, the democrats have demonized the bush tax cuts. and so we will see with the demon is. the 47% who do not pay income tax from about 30% of them will return to the tax rolls. and at least the pain is like to be spread around here to everybody. and i find the connection of the grover norquist problem is that if we returned to the clinton tax law, then everybody next year will just want to reduce taxes and the republicans will be free to vote for those things without the pledge interfering with that. i think what would solve that issue as well. so i think we would all be a lot better off. more dollars over 10 years. and it would come from every american. we have a huge problem here. and by the president's position of and not willing to dip below $250,000, is just as impractical as grover norquist's no tax pledge. i find the president's position ju
become self-reinforcing, so you have more political inequality that generates laws and regulations that lead to more economic inequality, and that goes back into political inequality. the example i find astounding are something like our bankruptcy laws. something very technical. nobody normally gets interested in. one provision of the bankruptcy law is that when you go bankrupt, the question is, who gets paid first? that a big issue. the answer is, the derivatives. not a surprise. because they put it in when everybody else was not noticing who pays attention to bankruptcy laws? what does that mean? that means you encourage that kind of economic activity. but at the other extreme, student loans can't be discharged even in bankruptcy. so, that means that the banks do well, but it really discourages people borrowing for student loans, and in a country where we have tuition going up, in the last three years, average state university tuition has gone up 40%, because of the cutbacks in state budgets. incomes are going down, the only way that people can afford it is borrowing, and then th
, they are mandated by law -- mr. reagan and his troops, when they read it so security in 1983-1986, they came up with federal employees retirement system. they were wanting to eliminate several services altogether. that was because of the benefits. if you have $1,000 so security retirement for your benefit ♪s. ts, it would offset your benefits by $1,000 also. you're supposed to get say 1275 and you get $1,000 worth of social security, they reduce your disability retirement by $1,000. host: got it. ♪ caller it doesn't leave you a whole lot oin there. there were a lot of private, wealthy people who cut benefits to the people who are served by them and chop it up. you figure 300 different companies are running it, they are not going to be able run it efficiently and work together. guest: the caller points out that there is a lot of this dispute that has to do with the sort of basic mathematics of benefits that are going to be owed to the postal service workers that will be retiring in the next few years. really, the crunch time is really going to be over the next 5-10 years. they are trying to
of congress are calling to shut down the accounts of groups including hamas and hezbollah. one of the law americas leading that effort is a texas congressman. he made a similar demand back in september. >> the groups don't have a right to use an american company to promote terrorism through the world. >> they will respond to members of congress directly. >> fox news learned west virginia republican shelly moore capita will announce her candidacy for u.s. senate. she was select to do her 7th term will run for jay rockefeller's seat. he has held the seat since 1984 but has not said if he will run again in 2014. >> what would you do with $425 million? that is where the jackpot for power ball stands right now. no one picked the winning numbers for the weekend drawing so you can run out and buy your ticket before the mad rush begins. the drawing is wednesday night. let's make our plans now. >> office pool. >> congress returns to work today and they are ready to tackle the fiscal cliff crisis. lawmakers are ready tro compromise. >> lawmakers are ready to give in on tax changes in order to get s
vii of the civil rights act, which as you know is our antidiscrimination law. under. the supervisors is imbued with the employer's authority. an employer can be held liable if a nonsupervisor employee harasses another employee. but it's tougher to prove. you have to shout employer knew or should have known about the harassment and failed to act. maida vance brought this lawsuit against ball state university. she's an african american woman working in the dining services division of the university, claimed she was harassed by a white coworker, was slapped on the head, blocked at the elevator, racial epithets were used such as "sambo" and "buckwheat" in her presence. she complained and finally brought her lawsuit against the university. she lost in the lower courts. the lower court, federal appellate court, said this coworker was not a supervisor, and took the definition that is probably the most restrictive-- that is, the supervisor has to be somebody who can make a tangible employment decision, such as hiring and firing. >> brown: today it made its way to the supreme court, and her l
been doing without any justification to international law whatsoever. america will be in trouble and obama is in trouble. this is a big problem for obama and his legacy. >> you hippie. >> i consider myself pro drone, but i didn't think about it. other people could have the drones too. shoot them out of the sky. >> it is going to be one big drone party there. >> michael, here is my question. where is the anti-war movement on obama? like imogen. >> internationally it is there. there was a big survey recently of 20 countries. over 50% of people in those 17 countries thought the american use of drones was outrageous. so internationally there is a big scandal about america's use of drones. >> they never have a problem with obama. >> and international communists, unreal. >> what do you think? >> you know, i am surprised the graph there and the administration said there was a concern that the believers may no longer be in our hands which is why they were trying to establish policy. they said it is totally fine to blow things up when we do it, but we don't trust the mitt romney guy. >> i
arrested for riding a man tee. she said she is new to the area and didn't realize it was against the law. there was not a sign saying do not ride the man tee. >> don't harass the manatee. >> stephanie: what's weirder than florida? germany. erotic zoos prompt germany to rein state beastalty laws. apparently they've been off the books since 1969. >> interesting hmm. wow. 1969, dude. ♪ >> stephanie: the agriculture minister -- miniature -- he's a regular size. he's not even tall enough to ride a manatee. [ speaking german ] [ laughter ] >> stephanie: a law would make it illegal for people to use animals for sexual acts of their own activities or third parties. the daily mail ties this decision to the recent rise of erothic zoos where people can -- ♪ >> stephanie: where people can visit. >> no! germans are freaks! >> stephanie: well, they can visit to have sex with animals ranging from llamas to goats. >> ok, well, of course. llamas also kick and spit. good luck with that. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: they like 'em feisty. >> i guess so! well, you couldn't reallile wear a cup. >> that defe
through college and law school. these loans make a big difference, whether it is pell grants or loans. let me look at this honestly. 25% of the federal aid education goes to for-profit schools. they have more than double the student loan default rate than any other. there are ways to cut back on spending and education that will give us opportunities and resources for real education, which can be part of our future. when it comes to the most painful topic of all. i came here in 1983 and was told social security would be on its way out. we rolled up with our sleeves and came up with a bipartisan solution that ultimately bought over 50 years of solvency for social security. we raised the retirement age, payable taxes on social security, and we taxed those social security benefits indirectly for the first time. today, social security will make every promised payment for the next 22 years. you cannot say that about much in washington. social security has not added one penny to the deficit. for those who say there is good reason to push it off the table and wait, i would add a note of caution. s
liberty university to obamacare. they argue the law mandates that employers purchase of insurance is unconstitutional. it'll be reheard. they been any outcome, the supreme court can eventually choose to hear the case. michael bloomberg released in the request for federal aid for recovery following super storm sandy's devastation. they estimate the total to the $19 billion in losses with the net cost to repair the damage south of $10 billion. u.s. immigration and customs enforcement teaming up to announce the seizure of 132 internet domain names accused of selling counterfeit merchandise. according to an icd press release, the websites are set up to do customers into unknowingly buby counterfeit goods this holiday season. those are your headlines, now back to melissa. melissa: thank you so much. as the fiscal cliff looms, one area that could be getting hit is your retirement savings. peter barnes is in washington, d.c., with more on this. why are you focusing on this part of the pie? >> it is one of the biggest tax breaks out there, melissa. budget negotiators talking about trimmin
detail. >> what you make me proud as a former law professor of what a law professor can do. you have done tremendous things for the case of marriage equality. my question follows up on your notion of marriage pluralism. my former colleague says marriage is two things -- a standard form contract that establishes certain kinds of liberal basic rights but also a sanctification. constituting form. she argues in liberal state has no business sanctifying relationships and that will be ought to be doing is be establishing, dis-establishing marriages altogether. do you see that 20 years and now when you give this talk will not even use the word marriage? >> it depends a william e. my liberal. if you are a libertarian liberal, as the cato institute is, they would say yes. if you are more of the state should create conditions for human flourishing, the answer is not simple. here is what i will say more broadly. one of the easy mistakes of the whole debate is an over investment in lesbian and gay people on marriage and family lot generally. most people who are in relationships are in relationships b
was your law partner in that old law firm. how did you get into this? i mean, what-- >> i had been writing since i was a kid. i was trying to sell short stories to the "new yorker" when i was 14 and realized if i changed my name to j.d. salinger my odds would be considerably improved. i spent 10 years writing short stories, that's what i really love to do. and i liked to read short stories in high school and college but i had no success doing that. i had a family early on, and it was something i kept doing. i went into screen play writing for a while and got an agent in hollywood which is almost impossible because most agents in hollywood i met don't know there is a state called virginia. they don't think anything exists owz of california. and i started writing my first novel "absolute power," and that kind of changed my life. i thought it would be the novel that would get the attention of an agent, and it was the big break i needed. >> schieffer: that later became a movie. >> it did become a movie. it was a movie where the main character of the novel makes no appearance at all in the film
these people have how much they depend on the rule of law with public purse structure and public treasury saving them. said to talk about the psyche of their fortunes based on political stability. >> of course, it varies but i was surprised there was also ayn rand and john paul fantasy. i was surprised that that was current. is it actual effort to build the gold goal to. the paypal guy is one of the founders it is more beautiful and you could make it up from milton friedman grandson. they're trying to the -- bill the island's in international waters where no laws apply. you could go and create your kind of world. there were some people and a do quote them in my book when a bomb gave his speech last fall the fdr commonwealth club speech, immediately there were investor notes that a plan that was discovered and all of the rich people should with there. more than you would take a very ayn rand type of sense you got this with foster friess, meant he gives them so much we are the job creators. also zero gary gensler was speaking with great passion and pleasure had there been the transparency t
who had physician cal maturity but not emotional maturity. we invented hools and child labor laws and it took forty years to create the word teenager. that was invented by somebody in their 60's but the main lesson is these stages of life were responses to problems. they were solutions. and it's ironic that it was stanley hall himself, the inventor of youth who proposed twenty years later a stage between midlife and old age arguing that he had actually made a mistake. he should have invented this stage for people like himself. he promptly passed away a year later but in writing about this period, he had asset of beautiful images and insights which make a lot of sense almost 100 years later. he described this period as an indian summer. and he said human beings didn't reach the height of their capacity until the shad dozen slanted eastward. the idea was more and more people were reaching a point where they had the benefits of experience and the capacity to do something with it. there was a book a couple of years ago that described the key traites of this period as active wisdom. i
money is that money, regulations -- that affected all the campaign fance laws. the citizens united decision was totally predictable as a response to mccain-fine gold. despite my working for john mccain, who had a campaign finance reform position i always thought was blazingly unconstitutional -- we have weakened the political parties and weaken the candidate committees. the political parties have been moderating influences in american politics -- the political parties goal is to assemble aajory, not to advance an ideology. the advancement of an ideology by either party is secondaryis a function of the majority. now, with all the super pac money there is incasingly ideological mey, increasing the enforcement money. reagan talked about the fact that if you are with me 80% of the time you are not my political opponent, you are my political ally. in a super p world where you have a apostate republican or an apostate democrats on an issue, you will see the enforcement of ideological discipline through the use of the super pac in a primary on either the left or the right. it has the fact
greece to actually change its laws so private creditors could no longer sue to collect if enough other creditors, like the e.c.b., also owned greek debt. could that serve as model for other countries? well, once you start changing laws, says hans humes, the sky's the limit. >> right now, we're teetering on something that's far worse than what we saw in latin america. >> reporter: in the 1980s or '90s you mean. >> yeah, i mean i lived in latin america, i saw it and i was part of the workout. this is worse. >> reporter: does lee buchheit then... >> have a lot of work? ( laughter ) >> reporter: yeah, i'm sure he has a lot of work, but does he bear a lot of the blame? >> no, no. i mean he's just reacting to the situation that's evolving. but i think there's a lot of concern that, if you have this legal coaching on how to really gut creditor rights, that you may actually end up in a situion ere nobodyantsto lend to countries. >> reporter: but if that's already a clear and present danger, we wondered why not just stiff the creditors? after all the history of sovereign debt is default, defaul
will also hear from president obama, who signed the deficit reduction measure into law, part of the deal to raise the debt ceiling. first, senate majority leader harry reid and republican majority leader mitch mcconnell will talk on the senate floor about the january fiscal deadline. >> since our country voted to return president obama to the white house, i have spoken often about compromise. i remain optimistic that, when it comes to our economy, when it comes to protecting middle-class families from a whopping tax hike, republicans and democrats will be able to find common ground. president dwight eisenhower, a republican, once said, "people talk about the middle of the road as though it were unacceptable. there have to be compromises. the middle of the road is all usable space." so said white house and higher. -- dwight eisenhower. too often, we face off, not realizing that the solution rests somewhere in the middle. i remind everyone of one fact. this congress is one vote away from avoiding a fiscal cliff for middle-class families and small businesses. we can solve the greatest econo
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